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Morning Joe

News/Business. Interviews with newsmakers and politicians; host Joe Scarborough. New.

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California 26, Us 22, Washington 20, Afghanistan 11, Doma 10, David Petraeus 7, Delaware 7, New York 7, Jonathan 6, Michael Steele 6, John Heilemann 5, Tsa 5, Tommy Sowers 5, Obama 5, Florida 5, New York City 5, Ap 4, Anthony Kennedy 4, Mike Barnicle 4, Mexico 4,
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  MSNBC    Morning Joe    News/Business. Interviews with newsmakers  
   and politicians; host Joe Scarborough. New.  

    March 27, 2013
    3:00 - 6:00am PDT  

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as we go throughout the next two weeks and slowly delivers, i think everyone is going to love april. great show, everyone. "morning joe" starts right now. ♪ a recent poll found that 58% of americans now think it should be legal for gays and lesbians to get married. and the other -- and, frankly, the other 42% object only because they don't want to go to another [ bleep ] damn we hadding! >> steven colbert's take pap live picture of the united states supreme court. a busy day yesterday and on this day again on march 27th, wednesday. with us is mike barnicle and
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msnbc little analyst mr. john heilemann and write for the "the washington post" and contributor for msnbc, jonathan capehart. and also formmichael steele. wp calling the court on the question of gay marriage ambivalent. can you choose your adjective here. skeptical is used by the "the washington post" on the question of whether or not this case each should have been brought before the supreme court. the supreme court said it will hear arguments this morning on the federal defense of marriage act or doma after tuesday's heated debate over california's proposition 8.
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inside, questions and from the jus justices. several on the bench focusing on the term standing that is whether the case had been properly defended by the state and traveled the correct legal path. that could set up the possibility of the high court throwing out the case altogether. some justices clearly concerned about the new legal frontiers ahead. >> you want us to step in and render a decision based on an assessment of the effects of this institution which is newer than cell phones or the internet? i mean, we do not have the ability to see the future. >> you're really asking, particularly because of the sociological evidence you cite, for us to go into unchartered waters and you can play with that metaphor. there is a wonderful destination a cliff, on whatever. >> that is justice anthony kennedy there who so often the case could be the swing vote
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here. he discussed what the case means for the children of same sex couples. >> there is an immediate legal injury or legal -- what could be a legal injury and that is the voice of these children. there are some 40,000 children in california, according to the brief, that live with same-sex parents. and they want their parents to have full recognition and full status. the voice of those children is important. >> two of court's most conservative justices, scalia and roberts, raised pointed questions over the level of marriage itself and the timing of this case. >> i'm curious. when did it become unconstitutional to exclude homosexual couples from marriage? 1791?
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1868 when the 14th amendment was adopted? >> may i ans this in the form of a rhetorical question? when did it become unconstitutional to prohibit interracial marriages? >> so it's just about the label in this case. >> the label is -- >> same-sex couples have every right but it's just about the label. >> the label marriage means something even to -- >> sure. if you tell a child somebody has to be their friend, i suppose you can force the child to say, this is my friend, but it changes the definition of what it means to be a friend. and that, it seems to me what supporters of proposition 8 are saying here. all you're interested in is the label and you insist on changing the definition of the label. >> that is the voice of chief justice john roberts there. >> if you're over the age of 55, you don't help us serve the government's interest and regulate through marriage so why is that different?
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>> your honor, even with respect to couples over the age of 55, it is very rare that both parties to the couple are infertile and the traditional. >> no, because if a couple -- i can just assure you if both the woman and the man are over the age of 55, there are not a lot of children coming out of that marriage. >> that's elena kagan right there. jonathan capehart, how old were you? seriously? >> no. move on. >> no. this is good. this is a fair question. >> not over 50. >> jonathan, let's start our conversation with you. it's always a treat to listen into the supreme court. we don't get to hear that very often. what did you take away from what you heard yesterday? >> the coverage in the papers you showed at the top of the show is correct. the court is ambivalent, it's
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torn, it doesn't quite know what to do. they don't want to have to deal with this question just yet. they are uncomfortable with the standings issue. the reason why they were having these conversations is because the governor of california, the attorney general of california decided they think proposition 8 is unconstitutional. they are not defending it. so a group of citizens got together to bring this challenge. so if the case goes down on standing, that would at least give the court the ability to say, we can't even decide this issue because you folks shouldn't have been here in the first place. but i do think they are also struggling with the question of -- this is something that ted olson is pushing, he is from the anti-prop 8 side -- is there a constitutional right to marry, a national constitutional right to marry? clearly from the questioning, the court is very uncomfortable with doing something for all 50 states when this case deals only
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with california. >> if supreme court decides this case should not have been in front of them in the first place, gay marriage will be allowed to stand in the state of california, because it was struck down by the supreme court there. it would be allowed in california but limited to california if this is what they decide? >> right. i'm struck in all of this by the comment by the court is not wanting to rule on something that is newer than cell phones and the internet. i think there is a real issue here. the court is fundamentally conservative body and tend to be behind social trends. it's true. this is a relatively new thing, but support for it is not that new. a great piece by nate silver in the papers today looking at how this has been essentially steady support for gay marriage around the country since 2004 so this isn't a snap thing. the court is usually behind social trends. this one is only building. >> john heilemann, yesterday, senator tester of montana came
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out in favor of same-sex marriage. the political shifts and supreme court is not immune to hearing the politics of this but the political shifts have been dazzling in the speed with which it has occurred irmt the train has left the station on this issue. the court for a lot of people who are in favor of marriage rights for gay people, if the court does decide to strike this case down on the basis of standing, that will be a victory for gay marriage and not just in the state of california but for the democratic process because it will essentially say the court's attitude is on a state-by-state basis, gay marriage can be instituted and that is federalism at its best and given the way the political tides are turning, senator tester is a good example but true across the country. in state after state, many very conservative states, the tide is maybe a little bit slower than in some of the more liberal states but the tide is headed in the right direction. a lot of southern states and
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rural states. >> mccaskill. >> from missouri. jonathan has pointed out on other shows on this network the fact that for a young republicans that it's now a majority issue. so this is not, as i say, the train that left the station. we will get to the point 20 years from now, gay marriage will be legal in 50 states and if the court does go in the moderate direction, as i said, it will be a triumph for marriage rights and i think the question is not when. not whether any more, but when this will simply be a settled matter across the country. >> a victory striking down prop 8, having the most populace state in the country have same-sexy marriage e qaelt would be huge. folks go to california and get married and go back to their home states and try to ply all of the benefits. we haven't talked about more than 30 states have either a state constitutional ban or a law banning same-sex marriage and that gets to why ted olson
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and a lot of marriage quality advocates want supreme court to do a sweeping ruling you wipe away all of those bans with one ruling. >> it would be faster to get there that way. >> otherwise, it's going to take decades to unwind all of these things. >> michael steele, we get into trouble when we read tea leaves at the supreme court. >> don't do that. >> what did you see last night? did you see any reason that it wouldn't be left to the state? >> no. i think this court very much wants to punt this bad boy back to the states as fast as they can get it there. i think they -- the adjectives that have been set forth already to describe the court's attitude or mindset i think are accurate. they are more than hesitant to jump into this. you saw that telltale sign last week from justice ruth bader ginsburg saying we made the mistake with roe versus wade by acting too soon. not giving the states a chance
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to actually vet this more fully. i think the justices really want to do that. i want to go back to a point that was made in the point in the statistics. support among the population is one thing. adjudication through the court system is something very different. i think now with the states as jonathan mentioned 30 states having adjudicated this constitutionally or legitimately wh -- legislatively. i think the court would rather have happen that way as opposed to a sweeping we are going to undo those 30 state legislative decisions or constitutional decisions. i think the final point is this activity on the ground among the state legislators is not the same level of activity or support that you see necessarily
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at the national level. you can cite all of these national individuals all you want who are coming around and find themselves evolved on the issue. state legislatures are where the action is and the game is. as you've noted, 30 states have said no to same-sex marriage. now the test is going to be whether or not that tide can change. >> i'm really interested in that ginsburg comment as well but i really feel it's not an apples and apples comparison. you think about abortion, that is still a hugely contentionus issue. not this clear trend in the polls heading in one direction. whereas, there completely is this time around and it's an age issue. as jonathan and others have pointed out conservatives, i think under the age of 35. >> under 18 to 45. >> 18 to 45 are more likely than older liberals to point this. >> not only that, michael, i would submit the flow of history
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is so powerful that various state legislatures and supreme court is inevitably caught up in this. maureen dowd is back in "the times" today after a long vacation. i want to read this one paragraph in part to you and get your red sox, michael. it has something to do with what you said. swing justice anthony kennedy grumbled about unchartered waters and seem to be looking for excuses not to make a sweeping ruling. the questions reflected unanimous impulse. thj is bold on imposing bad decisions on the country. but given a chance to make a bold decision, putting them on the right and popular side of history, they squirm. you certainly got that sense from a long line of questioning yesterday that they were squirming, looking for a way to push this away from them. >> that's true, but the court --
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i think justice roberts has been very clear about this. he's not looking to put the court on the right or the wrong side of history. he is trying to make the right constitutional decision which is why the standing issue is a big deal for a lot of these justices, including the very liberal justices who probably are very supportive of gay marriage but constitutionally know maybe this party shouldn't be the one bringing this. my only point is that i know while the society is very anxious and hyped up and moving in a general direction and we see 18 to 40-year-olds really pushing this issue and they are going to be the outcome determinative voice down the road, right now, the court is looking at the legislation that has been passed and the laws that have been put in place and the constitutionality of those laws in the context they need to act now and why you snem sort of sitting there going, we don't know yet. >> we are, obviously, going to talk a lot more about this this
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morning including in our next segment about the point jonathan made young republicans and their support for gay marriage. he was once the most high profile member of the united states military but since a scandal exposed, general david petraeus has stayed out of the spotlight but changed last night. he acknowledged last night his fall from grace. his first public speech since the revelation of his trist with his biographer. he was seeking not only forgiveness but a return possibly to public life. >> it truly is a privilege to be here with you this evening. all the more so given my personal journey over the past five months. i join you keenly aware that i am regarded in a different light now than a year ago. please allow me to begin my
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remarks how deeply regret and apologize for the circumstances that led to my resignation from the cia and caused such pain for my family, friends and supporters. i know i can never fully assuage the pain afflicted on those closest to me and a number of others. i can, however, try to move forward in a manner that is sufficient with which i subscribed before slipping my moorings. >> he called on the military community and the country to take care of its veterans of war. john heilemann, let me ask you about general petraeus' future. he was one of, call it the five most highly regarded americans in public, political life. before his fall, re have forgiven politicians and leaders many times before for shortcomings like this. what is his future? >> well, i think there's two
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different areas where we have to look at this. one is what is in the judgment of history about him in terms of his military service and what he accomplished? he will rehabilitate himself from that. people will forget about this scandal. it's irrelevant what he accomplished as a leader of the armed forces and in time this will go away. on the political side a question about whether general petraeus wanted a future outside of the military life and many people wanted him to get involved at that level and wanted him to take that step. it was never clear he wanted to, although various signs he had those ambitions. i think in terms of the forgiveness the public might give him, he would be fine. i think the question is for all people whose primary claim to fame and primary resume point is that they were successful in the military is how do you make that transition once you've lost that position? he's no longer someone -- he is no longer tethered to that
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pedigree. he is now kind of out on his own, right? so the question becomes not whether the country forgives him but in the context of forgiveness or lack of forgiveness what he would build a political future on if he no longer is involved in the enterprise that made and gave him the credibility that made him prominent in the first place. >> do you get a sense of listening to that, mike barnicle, a man who wants to reinsert himself in politics perhaps? >> i think he wants absolution, obviously. i don't know general petraeus, obviously, and i can't predict the future is quite obvious. to john's point, what is his platform? what does he stand on two or three years down the road, you know? i was great in mozell. >> that is one of the thingsive most sorry about in this whole episode is that this is a guy
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who has a lot to contribute on things like afghanistan, conflict in the middle east and what is going on in the middle east right now. i think he could say a lot there. i am fascinated. in england people go way for four years and do charity work. >> somebody said yesterday when they heard he was making a speech, what did he do again? >> right. >> the broadway thing. michael steele, if you were choosing a presidential candidate, would you like a guy who general petraeus resume at this point? >> yeah! duh! absolutely! hey, look. i think the whole petraeus flap-up was just that, a lot of noise about nothing at the end of the day. i think his comeback is something that should be welcomed by the country. i think a lot of people have found the forgiveness for him in their hearts and looking for
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better things from him down the road. his mayea culpa was well receiv and i think he is someone to look at whether behind or in front of the scenes someday. >> the real question, when you listen to general petraeus and think of him, why did he resign from the cia? >> that's right, michael. >> we will see if last night was the beginning of something new for him. coming up this morning on "morning joe," governor jack markell what his state can learn from gun safety. and tommy sowers what is the v.a. is doing on the backlog for wounded warrior claims. we will try out the number one sports app with the ceo of major league baseball bob bowman. >> genius. pure genius. >> the hosts of this show are sucking up for tickets so bad
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right now! >> a handsome guy. >> wonderful neighbor! great father. >> it's embarrassing but i hope you'll take me when you get them. we are also going to talk to sarah nelson, of the association of flight attendants in the senate to loosen restrictions on electronic devices on board passenger jets. do those things really interfere or not? >> no. >> we know the answer to that question already. >> first, bill karins with a look at the forecast. the cold is the topic all march but now all of a sudden easter weekend is approaching. will it hold? it looks like this morning a very cold morning in the deep south. we are watching these temperatures down there near freezing or below all the way almost down to the gulf. we are at 33 degrees in tallahassee, florida! at the end of march. that is very, very rare occurrence. so we have a deep freeze from tennessee through northern alabama and mississippi and georgia. it's colder in atlanta than it is even up in boston this morning. atlanta is almost as cold there as minneapolis. so, again, mostly the southeast
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that is exceptional cold and we are used to it in the northern half the country. a nice warm-up after a chilly start for new orleans and the days ahead will only get warmer. the holiday weekend good friday and easter. it looks loik the north carolina, virginia, d.c. area we have added some showers to your easter sunday forecast. yes, it's near 60 but you have to keep that in mind for any outdoor plans. other areas as we go throughout the holiday weekend florida getting a lot warmer where you should be with a slight chance of storms there on sunday. as far as chicago goes you're also looking warmer with a slight chance of showers there as we head towards the end of the upcoming holiday weekend. the bottom line is everyone is going to warm up this weekend but some of us will this dock edodging a few spring showers. you're watching "morning joe," a little breezy out there in the capitol out there. we are brewed by starbucks. ♪ ♪
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♪ welcome back to "morning joe." 6:25 in the morning in new york city. let's take a look at the morning papers. mark zuckerberg is organizing his own advocacy group. the group reportedly will push for new federal legislation on a slew of issues ranging from immigration reform to education. so far the group does not have a name but secured funds in the tens of millions of dollars. "the new york times." business front, prosecutors now investigating jp morgan. that is in addition to a separate criminal inquiry into the bank over the london trading debacle. the times report eight agencies looking into the business practices of jp morgan. >> pope francis is choosing to remain living in the vatican guest house even though
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renovations to the papal apartment are now complete. francis will remain there until further notice and adopting a more simple lifestyle and breaking a 100-year tradition. >> julia pierceson comes at a time of heightened activity to the secret service after 13 members caught up in a prostitution scandal last year in columbia ahead to president obama's trip to the country and she succeeds my friend mark sullivan, the director of secret service, who is a great guy. president obama's land mark health care overhaul may prove costly to the people it was meant to help. it predicts the medical claim costs will rise 132% under the affordable health care act and increase premiums for those who don't get insurance through their employers. obama was quick to di miss it as
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speculative. now with us is mike allen of politico with a look at the playbook. talk gun control to start off here. you have the piece up this morning talking about i guess about three months since the tragedy in newtown, connecticut. you're warning the momentum for gun control reform may very well be gone at this point. >> that's right. on friday, it will be 15 weeks. today is 103 days. gun control advocates are depressed as we talk to them about how things have unfolded and they wish there would have been a way to push things a little faster as "morning joe" viewers can remember so much momentum and such a sense of urgency about legislation right after that. that all has been sapped. now even universal background checks, addition we are most likely to get is now on the wish list of proponents of gun control, rather than an automatic check-off. the additional restrictions on
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assault weapons and additional restrictions on magazine clip size which is something joe thinks is very sensible and should have been a no-brainer. those aren't going to happen. we talked to a couple of senators who said this is moving as fast as any piece of legislation this year. that if you moved any faster, there would have been a backlash. our reporter pointed out george w. bush after the 9/11 attacks knew that he had a short window and it was on the 45th day after 9/11 that he signed the patriot act because in that window, he was able to get a lot more he would have been able to later. >> surprising, john heilemann, in some regards, given all of the emotion of newtown as many people point out this came down to votes, not emotion. there weren't going to be enough votes on the republican side but in many centrist.
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but i think a lot thought it would get through. >> i want to ask mike. who is to blame here, mike? is this a case where -- there was a period of time where it looked like the president and vice president and the administration were pushing this, understood what is written about here. the urgency of it and get through the window as fast as possible and seemed to have lost the momentum from that side. "saturday night live" the white house's fault or does the blame lay more broadly? >> it's systemic. newtown may have changed the country but it shows that newtown didn't change washington and there were distractions. one of the things that sapped some of the momentum were the weeks of conversation about the fiscal cliff at the end of the year. the president also pushing immigration at the same time. and this isn't the top priority of the president. in the state of the union
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address we heard him saying he wants a vote on some of these measures which is different than saying the country must have them. immigration is more of a must have for this president than gun control. he'll get some gun control but nothing like what he would have liked or would have looked like he would have gotten a few weeks or months ago. >> this is a disgrace the day after the state of the union address the president of the united states and senator harry reid didn't put it up on the floor and vote it up and down right now. put your name on. do it right now. disgraceful. >> i totally agree. i'm wondering actually, mike, do you have any thoughts on whether the bloomberg money situation is going to change anything? does that even matter at this stage or has that horse left the gate? >> no, it certainly could. more than $10 million that the mayor is against illegal guns as chaired by both mayor bloomberg
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and the mayor of boston. that is part of obama strategy also with immigration of bringing pressure from the outside. they are advertising in districts of vulnerable senators, senators that they think can be swayed and this is a way to keep up about public opinion pressure which eventually washington does respond to no matter how slow it is. >> mayor bloomberg saying he is not giving up despite what is happening in washington. democratsccusing ted cruz on back background checks. here is part of the interview. >> one of the things we could do is improve the quality of the federal database. right now a lot of states and legal jurisdictions are not reporting criminal convictions and not reporting mental health barriers to ownership, so the federal database is not as good as it should be. that would be a common sense improvement. >> democrats say in contrast to his plans to filibuster new gun
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legislation. is it? >> well, it is and it reflects these changing times. that interview was january 6th, three weeks after newtown. senator cruz's tone was very different than it is now. his office, and i think we have their statement. his office says that this remarks for being misconstrued in this youtube which was posted yesterday by senate majority leader harry reid. senator cruz and rand paul and mike lee of utah threatened a filibust filibuster. it is true that, in that bite that senator cruz is talking about improving existing databases and not spankexpandin them. as time has passed less pressure and these senators are gotten some backlash and see that with senator joe mannion of west
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virginia. he was eager to change his super pro nra position but he has gotten a lot of blow-back at home. he is telling us the white house doesn't understand guns. so that is another xamp how that pa -- example of how that passage of time has really hurt. >> cruz statement. they say senate democrats are misconstruing senator cruz's record to distract to distract from how extreme they are on gun control and how out of touch they are with the american people. >> that's terrible. imagine asking someone for a background check? that's a hideous invasion of privacy. >> mike, you point out in your piece even new gun trafficking law, which is sort of the
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smallest piece of all this is not even a sure thing to get through the senate at this particular time? >> no. also we have the house taking this position we will only take this up after the senate comes out because they don't want their members to have to take tough votes. so the soonest there could be a floor vote in the senate is april. they are gone two weeks. after that, the house process will start from square one. >> mike allen with a look inside the politico playbook, thanks so much. we will see you. >> thank you. forget college hoops. we are going to the high school ranks for our sports highlights today. check out the defensive gem from an illinois girls softball game. >> oh! >> that and highlights from the usa/mexico world cup qualifying watch coming up on sports.
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joe." let's turn to a little sports. a crucial world cup qualifying match in texmexico city last ni. usa taking on mexico where they have never won a world cup qualifier. scoreless. 76th minute.
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mexico on the attack. stricker down. mexico not pleased with the no-call. still scoreless in stoppage time. mexico a shot on goal but brad guzan is there for the save. the game ends in a scoreless tie and ends my hopes of convincing nonsoccer fans of the game. i'm trying to tell you it's exciting and it's a 0-0 tie. >> i don't understand it. >> top seed baylor taking on florida state. the best player in women's college hoops brittney griner putting on a show in her final home game after an incredible career. first half, baylor up big. griner throws it down with one hand. "w" in the house with the former first lady laura bush. pump fake and another
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throw-down! >> she is showing off. >> she is not done. under seven minutes to play. that is under the basket going up strong. that's not out in transition. throwing it down! 33 points, 22 rebounds in the home finale for the grate brittney griner. baylor rolls 85-47. they get five seed louisville in the sweet 16. a couple of amazing feature from the high school ranks. matt is an 18-year-old from pilot point, texas, who weighs less than 300 pounds and broke his own stated record in the power lifting meet there by putting up 700 pounds on the bench press. >> i've done that. >> he is perspective. he is 18. that is five pounds fewer than the reported nfl bench press record set by hall of famer larry allen. after this epic lift, he is getting looks as a football recruit. >> you know how he trains to do that? he sits there and he bench
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presses barnicle. >> oh, whoa. >> let's not be harsh today! >> how this bthis sthis? look at that. knicks and celtics played on the nba? >> in the senior league! >> ymca senior league last night. >> the nicks didn't just beat the celtics, the knicks thrashed them. >> celtics without three key players last night. melissa boyer of limestone high school. looks like it's gone but she crashes through the fence to rob the hit with a catch! keeps the ball in the yard with an out. >> limestone won 7-3. >> how did kim kardashian become such a celebrity? >> look at that. >> on the cover of "the "new york post." >> >> she is pretty.
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give her a break. >> looks like a maternity dress. >> have you ever met her? >> no i haven't. >> what a frock. >> where are you going with this? >> i'm going to meet her tomorrow night. >> where? >> on jay leno's "the tonight show". >> you're going to be on leno? >> yes, with miss kardashian. the two of us on the couch together. >> you and her on leno together? >> i'll be giving parenting tips. kanye will be there too. it will be great. why governor jack markell -- oh, look at this! delaware could become the tenth state to legalize same-sex marriage. the blue hens joins us next on "morning joe." ♪ sooner or later love is going to get you sooner or later love is going to win ♪ [ female announcer ] are you sensitive to dairy?
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welcome back to "morning joe." you see the sun coming up at 6:46 in the morning over the united states capitol in washington. joining us here in new york is democratic governor of the great state of delaware, governor jack markell. good to see you. >> good to see you. >> you pointed out glaring omission in our sports report and you're correct. one of the great, perhaps the second best women's college basketball player in the country. >> some of us think maybe the best. >> really? okay. you have to say that, i understand. >> you better believe it. >> a big win for delaware in the ncaa tournament yesterday. >> it was amazing. i was there last night. the vice president was there. blue hens were down by about eight at halftime. came back and beat north carolina who was seeded third and blue hens seated sixth. on to bridgeport, connecticut
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against kentucky. delle donne is a great player. >> and on a great team. >> this is for you. >> thank you very much. is that going to fit barnicle? >> look good in him. >> that's mine. >> let's talk about what you're doing right now. we can start with gun control in the state of delaware. just talked about the national conversation. you put out a package of five gun control measures. where does that stand right now and how difficult has it been to get some of stuff through? >> first of all, it's really less about gun control and more about common sense proposals to reduce gun violence and keep weapons out of the wrong hands. we introduced five proposals as you say. one, universal background check. got out of the house committee last week. and expect taken up in the full house tomorrow. overwhelming public support but doesn't make it easy in the legislature. we have continuing work to do to
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educate the legislature on that bill and other bills as well. >> you phrased it as a disconnect between the public, voters and people serving in the legislature who were voted into the legislature by this very same public. is there any rational explanation for this disconnect? >> that's really looking nationally. if you look nationally overwhelming public support for a number of these proposals really common sense proposals. but so many folks in washington just don't want to hear it. we are hopeful that in dover, delaware, it will be a different situation. but i think let's face. as soon as you talk about universal background checks and as you said just a moment ago, it doesn't sound so bad making sure you're checking it out before somebody gets a weapons. the other side immediately says you're infringing on our second amendment rights. that is not what this is about. nothing in our proposals has nothing to do with confiscation of weapons. we support the second amendment. >> do you think we really are at the beginning of a longer term
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change, though? when i look at how the nra started to influence this issue in the '70s, it took years and decades for things to change. i mean, are we talking about a 20-year process here? >> i think it's hard to know. i think as many of us thought after sandy hook, connecticut, you know, the moment was right to focus on some really common sense proposals but as you just reported this morning, as mike allen just talked about, it's not clear that it's shaking out that way. i think what we have to do is keep the focus on, keep the pressure on and let people know this is just really common sense and it's about keeping weapons out of the wrong hands. >> michael steele down in washington, are gun control advocates knife to think anything big will get down. if not after newtown when 20 children are slaughtered inside their own classroom when for gun control advocates? people are asking that now as the moment seems to be slipping away a little bit. >> yeah. i think a lot of pressure now that is going to reemerge to push, to mike barnicle's point
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which i thought was the most salient this morning, that this issue cannot get lost because washington won't act. to the governor, it's good to see you, governor. >> you too. >> you're a neighbor to the south here. we share the eastern shore, although i think our blue crabs a little bit better but we can talk about that. how do you find your regional partners, the governors around you, obviously, in maryland, we are pushing, through our legislature, stronger gun controls. martin o'malley is one and great resistance are the legislators even among democrats. how are the regional partners responding to this issue? >> governor o'malley has been taking on this issue in a serious way as has some other states. i think it gets to a broader and very important point. when you're talking generally about crime the regional cooperation is important. so governor o'malley and i met a
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year ago to talk about what intrastate cooperation we could have going across the boards to get after the bad guys and how to work together. you think on the i-95 corridor it's so easy to get one city to the next and one state to the next. >> governor, i want to ask you what is in front of the supreme court this week and question of gay marriage. you said yesterday that you expect at least to have some kind of a bill bied ent of the year that could make delaware the tenth state to legalize gay marry marriage. >> my hope is passes. to show how quickly public opinion is shifting on this issue. four years ago in delaware it was legal to discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation. think about that. four years ago. we first changed that in 2009. two years ago passed civil unions and i think a pretty good chance same-sex marriage will pass in delaware this year. i've never seen an issue that has moved so quickly and i think, in large part, because of our kids. two years ago when i signed the
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civil union legislation in delaware, 600 people showed up. the most emotional bill signing and people said they had seen in 40 years. when i got home that night i told my kids, both tergenagers. they think it's the way it's always been and should be and always will be. >> happens across the country. quickly how quickly about the vice president come from getting thrown out last night yelling? >> he was very well-controlled. it was different. he and i were together two years ago in texas when the university of delaware football team was playing in the national championship. we were winning 19-0 midway through the third quarter. ended up losing 20-19 to eastern washington. we talked to each other last night a minute to go. we said this thing is not in the bag yet. with ten seconds to go, he turned to me and said, jack, this is not fresno, texas. where we lost a couple of years ago. >> look at the blue hens into the sweet 16. joe flacco, the ravens. this is a delaware moment for
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sure. >> absolutely. >> governor, always good to see you. we will be right back. we're on a budget we're not ready for spring. well lets get you ready. very nice. you see the various colors. we got workshops every saturday. yes, maybe a little bit over here this spring, take on more lawn for less. not bad for our first spring. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. keep your yard your own with your choice, a special buy at just $8.
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in court today saw why i like it a lot better when this guy is on my side as opposed to against me. >> that this is not a democratic issue or republican issue or conservative or liberal. this is an issue of american constitutional rights. >> look at that sunrise. where is that, is that here? >> that's new york.
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>> that's new york? wow. >> baja, california. >> it's not doctored? is that real? >> a real shot in new york city. sun rising at -- this is the best tv we have had. >> a little music. >> i'd watch that. >> keep it up for the next hour! >> that was quite a sight yesterday. the two lawyers who fought on opposite sides of bush v gore in 2000, arm in arm yesterday outside the supreme court. welcome back to "morning joe." joining us from washington is pulitzer prize winning columnist the associate editor of "the washington post" and msnbc political analyst, eugene robinson. good to see you this morning, eugene. >> good morning, willie. how are you doing? >> i'm doing okay. you wrote a piece a couple of days ago that was posted yesterday tough on the supreme court anticipating what they
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were going or not going to do in this case. has your opinion changed at all based on what you heard yesterday? >> not really. first of all, as we know from the health care decision, what it sounds like in oral argument is not necessarily what they are going to do. >> right. >> nonetheless, let's just plow forward because it was a fascinating day and they have the whole range of options from upholding proposition 8 which it seems unlikely they are going to do, just flat-out uphold the thing, to declaring a new constitutional right a constitutional right to gay marriage. i thought there was a slight chance they would do that. i guess i still do think is there a slight chance they are just going to do it and get it over with. but slightly more of a slight chance than i would have thought
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before yesterday. >> gene, what about the question of standing? the justices asked a lot of questions about whether that case should be before them in the first place. so you think that would be something that the court would use as an out to get out of answering the other question that is before them and whether there is a constitutional right to marry? >> i think it's entirely possible that they could use standing to get out of answering this question, because it is a weird situation where, you know, a state of california initiative that the state of california government won't defend. so a lot of questioning about can just like random keyhole defend this initiative or does it have to be something appointed by the government that doesn't want it upheld in the first place. so, yeah, they could -- actually, there are standing questions in the defense of marriage act case as well, since
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the federal government, the obama administration, will not defend it and believes it's unconstitutional and that is the one is that going to be argued today. theoretically they could say we don't know why we took this case because it is unstanding. >> gene, in the doma case, though, isn't the difference in terms of standing, it's not the administration or the federal government defending doma. it is a group of lawyers put together by the speaker of the house, by the house of representatives. >> right. >> so they do have, i think, a whole lot more standing than the group of people, the group of citizens that got together for prop 8. >> right. it's not exactly the same but there is still a question. there is still -- it is still unusual that the administration, that the government this theoretically would be defending this and solicitor general should defend it but solicit tor
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general wi solicitor general will argue against doma. since they took the two cases one presumes they want to make some sort of decision. >> we have with us pete williams, who has been all over this case and doing great reporting yesterday. pete, i was listening to you. it seemed to me you boiled it down yesterday to say based on what you heard yesterday, again, we don't know what the decision will be, but probably no sweeping ruling on gay rights some people had hoped in the same-sex marria same-sex marria same-sex marriage across this country. may stand in country but not impact the whole country. >> i think that is right. no sweeping decision on either side, a decision in favor of same-sex marriage apply nationwide or a decision uphold prop 8 with a resounding decision. it seems like the court will figure out some way to simply send the case back, probably
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strike down prop 8 or leave the lower court rulings in intact that struck down prop 8 and that will allow marriage to resume in california. it was going on for six months, same-sex marriage, before prop 8 passed but have no effect outside of california. the supreme court doesn't have to take most cases. it takes four votes to grant. it seemed likely from yesterday's argument that it was the four conservative justices, the most conservative justices who voted to grant this case and not anthony kennedy who seemed somewhat annoyed that the court was hearing this case now. so without a clear consensus either way, the court will either say you know what? we just can't decide this case. we are just going to dismiss it or say the prop 8 supporters didn't have the legal right to be here in the first place. some sort of technical way to dispose of this case without getting to the fundamental issue. >> michael steele is also in washington and has a question for you, pete. >> yeah. real quick. what is the general mood -- the
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court is not influenced what is going outside its walls obviously. but is there a sense from the folks around you that this thing is moving in the right direction ultimately or is it still sorted of ambivalence as "the washington post" and others have mentioned this morning out there amongst those who are supporting it one way or the other on this question? >> well, i think we did see a big contrast yesterday between the sort of momentum in the country and reluctance here in supreme court. several of the conservatives said this is moving too fast. they said the social science, research on the effect on children is unclear and supreme court seemed to be reluctant to come up with a resounding ruling in favor of same-sex marriage. so perhaps there's a little mismatch there. it may be we will feel a lot more of that today in terms of the momentum on this prop 8 case because i really think there's a chance here for a clearer ruling
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on whether the 17-year-old law, the defensive marriage act, still makes constitutional sense today. i have to say that one has procedural problems of its own. it's possible the court won't get to it either but i find it it likely they will say we can't resolve either one of these issues and i think this is more likely to get a clearer ruling. >> pete, the dialogue yesterday among the justices just reading about it was such a terrific educational experience. it leads me to ask you do you know anything about the internal feeling within the court about televising hearings sometime potentially in the future? >> reporter: yes. i think zero justices independence in that. justice breyer and kennedy were testifying before congress here a couple of weeks. the question came up then. justice breyer said he is worried about the effects of television coverage on the justices themselves. they say that they are stewards
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of the court. if it ain't broke, don't fix it. the two newest justices, souter and kagan seemed acceptable to it but they have changed their tune since then. but it's a long time. i will be long gun before there is television coverage of the court. >> we hope not, pete. rana has a question. >> we know that marriage is good for children and stability is good for children. where is that argument going? are there any other cases that set an interesting precedent there that you would cite? >> reporter: no, i don't think any other cases you can think about here. it is interesting that justice kennedy seemed to be arguing this from both sides. he did say early on that if you look at negative effects of not allowing same-sex couples to get married, he said listen to the
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voices of the children. he talked about a friend of the the court brief filed on behalf of 37,000 children of same-sex couples in california and he said it hurt them that they can't say their parents are married. on the other hand, he said you're asking us to go into unchartered waters is the phrase he used, when the social science isn't clear on the effects of same-sex marriage. just alito said only the netherlands that started permitting it in the year of 2000 an you're asking us to rule on something newer than cell phones and the internet. at least from the conservatives on the court they seem to say we don't know what this thing is yet and we are not ready to pronounce one way or the other on it. >> pete, we have a supreme court sized panel of our own here. eugene robinson now with a question for you. >> pete, after today's argument, they will have these two cases before them and will they, do you think, look at them as a
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pair and decide, okay, we will take these two cases and we are going to make our statement on gay marriage and where it is now? or will they sort of sever them and take sequentially? in other words, will this be the supreme court's statement on where we are and where we go on gay marriage? >> reporter: you know, i think that's is an excellent question. . i have to assume the answer is yes. i think they decided these two -- they evaluated these two cases as a pair when they decided to take them. they announced the grants the same day. and i think if they are thinking in these sort of grand strategic ways they could say, well, we are not going to do much on prop 8 but we are going to do something more profound or more clear on the doma case. so i do think that -- i think that they probably see them as a pair. you know, look at all of the atmospherics. they granted them the same day and they are arguing them one day after another and allowing the audio in both cases to be relieved. i think they see them as a pair.
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>> pete, hey, it's john heilemann here. just to draw you out a little further on that. it seems like from listening to what you're saying and listening to what other smart people who are court watchers have said, the way in which seem a coherent answer to this is for supreme court to dismiss the prop 8 case on standing but rule on the doma case in a pro federalist way and say this is crazy that congress ever passed a law where federal government got into the business of deciding what state marriage licenses were valid. we want to kick this whole thing back to the states and that would be an outcome that would turn it back to the political process. the federal government would be out of this business and let states decide at whatever pace they wanted to decide to bring marriage equality into the public acceptability. does that seem like one possible likely outcome that would sum this thing up from the way you were describing that would
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cohere a lot of the two cases? >> reporter: it seems like the most possible outcome. i think that makes perfect sense. you know, i think the atmospherics to use your term, is a little different. doma, same-sex marriage, the court could say that is relatively new or prop 8 but the doma law has been around for 17 years. and all of the sort of background on that has changed. president clinton who signed it now said he thought it was a bad idea. the house republicans, remember, are defending it because the obama administration decided it's unconstitutional. but even they he are not out there aggressively defending it. the most that the speaker would say about doma last week, it was sort of a civics lesson on why they are defending it. he said we are defending it because the obama administration doesn't get to tell you what is constitutional, the supreme court does so why we are funding this lawsuits. in other words, it was explaining why it's good practice to have both sides be
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represented by lawyers rather than the kind of values ladened defense why the federal government shouldn't recognize same-sex marriage. >> pete williams, outside supreme court. we appreciate your insight. we are lucky to have you with us. the best in the business. eugene robinson, thank you. we will be reading your column at thewashingtonpost.com. >> we are lucky to have justice john heilemann here today. >> he is very good, isn't he? very impressive. >> just an incredible thing that picture we started. 13 years later, david boise an ted olson. remarkable thing. >> tommy sowers with a response to the serious backlog many
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veterans are faced when applying for disability benefits. and up next, jim miklaszewski what general petraeus is saying after his career was ended at the cia five months ago. >> and goes without saying, you're lucky to have me here this morning. >> i'm glad you said it because i wasn't going to. >> of course, not. save the jokes for leno. it's cold once again, everybody. glass half full thing again. one thing we have been missing this march is severe weather and tornadoes because it's been so cold. haven't been warm enough or humid enough to have the big storms so that is good news. people in florida are looking outside the window and they are daring to go outside! it's 41 in orlando. by their standards that is cold. 33 in jacksonville. so the cold air dominates the map. let's track it. the cold air is shown in blue. the next holiday weekend it
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restreets where it should. this time of the year. another blast comes in sunday and monday through the northern plains and the great lakes and that will clip into new england by about tuesday of next week and wednesday. we are not completely done with the cold air but thrice it's out of the middle and southern half of the country. you expect to go into april the northern half of the country still flirts with winter a little bit. more back to normal and feel warm to many of us. this map shows you what the temperatures should be in red and white numbers where you are today. atlanta, new orleans and orlando 10 to 15 degrees below average. you're pretty close to average up there in new england and many on the west coast dealing with average temperatures. so, again, big story as we head towards april we are done with the worst of this nasty winter weather we have experienced this march. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. ♪
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here with you this evening. all the more so given my personal journey over the past five months. i join you keenly aware that i am regarded in a different light now than i was a year ago. so please allow me to begin my remarks how deeply regret and apologize for the circumstances that led to my resignation from the cia and caused such pain for my family, friends and supporters. i know i can never fully assuage the pain that i inflicted on those closest to me and on number of of others. i can, however, try to move forward in a manner that is consistent to the values with which i subscribed before slipping my moorings. >> that was former cia director
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david petraeus last night in his first public appearance and apology since his resignation. joining from the pentagon is nbc chief pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski. good to see you this morning. >> reporter: good morning, willie. >> was that something last night for general petraeus and if so, what was it? >> reporter: no one knows what is immediately in store for general petraeus. he is doing active work if the veterans and the wounded and the like. a book is clearly in the works. but it was only a matter of time, because his broad-base of supporters have always insisted despite what really was probably one of the most stunning falls from grace here in washington ever, that they insisted that david petraeus would be back and don't count him out. >> mick, first of all, it's great to see you. i mean, you don't want to get up early to appear with us too
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often. i understand that. it's great to see you, old pal. >> i don't have a scooter and people to give me a newspaper like you do! >> even jim miklaszewski is being dreadful to me now. >> but he got it wrong. it's a rascal. >> given that the hierarchies in the pentagon is better than acamem acamemia in some schools, what is the feeling of general pare tr petraeus among list followers? >> he had a large base of detractors too. petraeus was all about not only winning the wars but shaping his own persona, his image. and because of that, many in the military thought that he was a bit of a grandstander. one of the things a lot of people within the military and
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each within the administration resented, during the iraq war, president bush totally bypassed the chain of command and directly called david petraeus to talk about the strategy, which really has been unheard of as far as i know in terms of recent military history. so while he was ghied, he did have his detractors, but nobody criticized his operations of the war in iraq or afghanistan. >> i'm interested in that. i was saying earlier one of the things i found really disappointing about the entire scandal was the fact that he had to leave at a time when the country really could have used his expertise in those two areas. how do you view that in terms of afghanistan? >> in terms of strategic planning in afghanistan david petraeus made it quite clear i'm
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director of the cia. i am not going to meddle in the affairs of afghanistan. it was an interesting dynamic in terms of his assention to the cia director. whether the stories are true the white house feared that david petraeus would run for president against barack obama, i never thought that was in the cards ever. but it was clear to many here in the building that by putting him in the cia, he was somewhat pigeon-holed. you know? in michael gordon's story in "the new york times." not only was he getting up to speed, but the operations in the cia were such that they don't lend themselves to a lot of public appearances. so in that case, if the white
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house, indeed, was worried about petrae petraeus, they took care that have in one fell swoop. >> what you know about general petraeus does he strike is awe someone who seeks higher political office but is that projected on him by other people? >> i think it's been projected on him. i guess eisenhower was the last best example of a general transitioning into politics. but so many of these generals are used to having this cadre of support around them and the ultimate authority in their particular venue. to have petraeus out on the campaign trail and suffering the slings and arrows the personal kind of attacks thrown at him, i just didn't see him going for that. i don't think he would have stood for it. >> jim miklaszewski at the pentagon, great to see you. any time you want to come back on and take shots at mike barnicle, the invitation is
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open. >> what about the red sox this year, speaking of mike? or is that a shot too? >> better than the economy. better than what people expect by mid september. >> he said that last year. >> mick, thanks a lot. on tomorrow's show, the chairman of the house intelligence committee congressman mike rogers and former new jersey governor mcmcgreevey will be with us and actor ray liotta is back for his latest film. how is that for a lineup in "morning joe" back in a moment. ♪ for his latest film. how is that for a lineup in "morning joe" back in a moment. ♪ ♪
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[ engine revs ] do we hano.a mower? a trimmer? no. we got nothing. we just bought our first house, we're on a budget we're not ready for spring. well lets get you ready. very nice. you see the various colors. we got workshops every saturday. yes, maybe a little bit over here this spring, take on more lawn for less. not bad for our first spring. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. keep your yard your own with your choice, a special buy at just $8.
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president obama has appointed the first-ever female director of the united states secret service. the previous director mark sullivan retired last month. after 13 members were caught up in a prostitution scandal last year in columbia. ahead of president obama's trip to that country. a new study finds nonpartisan
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society of actuaries predict medical claim costs will rise 32% under affordable care act and likely increase premiums who don't get insurance through their employers. the jump is expected to vary by state. by 2017 florida would see 20% increase and ohio's rising something like 80% according to the study. the obama administration was quick to dismission the study as speculative but kathleen sebelius did acknowledge some people will see their health care costs go up. surprised those numbers at all? >> i'm not surprised by the state-by-state blip. the fact we have this patch work system in this country increases costs. i have a little bit of a bias because i lived and worked in europe for many years and i had two children under the national health care system in britain. i do think you get the big
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efficiencies in costs when you have one system that is connected, the technology is the same across a country. i'm not surprised to see that kind of differentiation between the states. i am curious i know the affordable care act stresses preventive care and one of the ways to bend the health cost curve so i'd love to see those numbers and see what the increases are coming from. >> the truth is, we don't know yet how much it it will play out because a lot of it it is implemented yet. >> still ahead from the department of veterans affairs, tommy sowers is here to discuss the backlog many veterans face awaiting their disability benefits. keep it here on "morning joe." ♪
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first-time claim you come back from iraq and afghanistan you'll wait 500 to 600 days. >> most of these claims still proved on paper. why is it so slow? >> we don't know. we are looking from the outside, right? it's like looking at a broken down car on the side of the road and saying what is wrong with the engine when we can't look under the hood. they need more people, they got more people. everything they have asked for, congress and the veteran service organizations have given them. but the numbers continue to go up. the backlog continues to climb. >> that was part of our conversation yesterday on "morning joe" with the ceo and founder of the iraq and afghanistan's veterans of america paul rye could have expressing his frustration what the veterans face when they file for disability benefits. here with us now is the shift secretary of department of veteran affairs, tommy sowers. appreciate you being here. >> great to see here. >> i know you understand why this is so outrageous.
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if you come home with an injury, we will take care of you that some people are waiting as many as 700 days to have their claims proved. why is it taking so long to take care of our veterans? >> look. both secretary and president obama know that disability claims backlog is unacceptable and they are impatient to fix it. this has been decades in the making and we are putting solutions in to fix it for good. one thing i want to make sure we are clear on from the very beginning that iraq and afghanistan veterans have been granted five years of cost-free health care so we have to separate compensation from care. not only have they been granted it, they are utilizing at a rate higher than any generation before 56% are. so if there is a veteran out there that is watching and seeing these numbers, they should know that they can comoo in any one of our facilities and they will join 800,000 iraq and afghanistan veterans that have.
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we know that this process is taking too long. that's why we have put in a technology fix. this is a claim, not an average claim. two and a half inches thick. in it are private medical records, department of defense medical records. this is what we inherit in 2009. millions of these paper documents with no plan to fix it. so the president directed the secretary, don't just do things quickly. take care of the transformational effects to transform the department to move out of this paper into electronic. >> as paul pointed out there there has been a lot of money, a lot of resources to get this electronic program. there was a study out a couple of weeks ago showed 97% of the claims still filed on paper. if you have this new system why are still going through folders like that? >> this is a great question. this is what we receive.
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right now, there's a new program where you can submit your claim electronically. as long as we get this paper we will have challenge and why we need to partner with veterans and veteran services organizations. not only to file claims electronically but file them completely. we only get about 5% our claims with the paper work needed to rate a claim. 5%. we spend about six months going and trying to find private medical records, department of defense records. we have got to partner with folks to get that number up. then the second thing, real quick, we have about a million veterans that will be leaving the service -- service men and women leaving for service the next four years. we have got to educate the junior leaders out there that are going to sit down with those young service men and women and say what are you doing next? you're going to go and use the post-9/11 g.i. bill, great. gheed to educate them to file the claim when they get out of the the military right then and
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there is the best way to do it. >> if you can for public education, track the claim. when and where was it filed and what happened to it and where is it now? >> well, so when i showed up, i heard a lot of about this backlog and decided i'd go out to one of our offices that is processing these claims. when you go out to one of these offices they receive this paper. you learn a few things. one about 50% of the employees that are working these claims are veterans themselves. these are veterans trying to help veterans. about two-thirds of -- if this stack is all 800 and some odd thousand that are currently awaiting rating, about two-thirds of them are supplemental claims. one who is seeking additional care and compensation. so, you know, this is the challenge, though. i don't know the last time -- when was the last time you looked up something in the encyclopedia? that's what we are asking these
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folks to do but now we are transsixing to an electronic system where people don't have to search through here when did that injury occur, they just type it in. >> i don't think anyone doubts your intentions are good but what can you say to a veteran in reno, nevada, waiting almost two years to get that claim processed? what do you tell that guy who is sitting there with an injury, maybin internal, maybe it's external. what do you tell them? >> i say don't wait for care. you can come into any of our facilities. if you're in a crisis right now, you can call 1-800-273-talk. this is our veterans crisis line. over 700,000 veterans, military families, active duty military have called this number and we have saved almost 26,000 veterans in crisis. so for that veteran that is needing that care, they need to come in and get that care right now. on the compensation, look.
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both the secretary and the president know that we have got to fix this. for really over the past decade it's been about six-month wait. >> why in the year 2013 are you still dealing with paper? what has happened here? >> why in 2009 were we dealing with paper some when we came in, we inherited this paper process. there was no plan in order to transition this over. we had been dealing about a six-month average wait for a decade. this secretary -- look. this secretary and this president know how to make tough decisions when they are right decisions. they know how to look at something and say the veterans shouldn't have to wait this long. we will make this fix and put in a technology solution to lower that. right now the goal is 125 days. >> you guys have been in office four years, you said. you've got, as you pointed out, millions of veterans are going to be coming home or tens of thousands of veterans coming home over the course of the next couple of years.
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this seems like an emergency situation. people think you guys have been at this four years and the situation is worse than it was than when you guys came in four years ago. so people outside in the press and other places calling for the secretary to step down as chief of staff has just left. you seem a little besieged by the situation right now. if -- what do you need to address what is a pressing emergency situation and make this problem right on a quick time line? >> let me address those two parts. one is the question of leadership. look. a lot of our critics, we agree part of what they say. we know this is unacceptable and we know we need to get digits from d.o.d. when it comes to leadership and addressing things for our veterans, look. four years ago, the post-9/11 g.i. bill was just an idea and now 900,000 iraq and afghanistan veterans, including myself, have benefited from it. four years ago, post-traumatic
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stress was not treated the same way. agent orange was not treated the same way. gulf war syndrome was not treated the same way. this president and this secretary giving justice to veterans. probably the most important thing four years ago we were in two wars. we were in two wars that we didn't see an end to. if you want to talk about taking care of the troops, the fact when this president and this secretary leaves, these wars will be -- that is leadership. >> i want to ask you a question. my "time" magazine joe klein wrote a blog asking whether claims were processed in terms of severity. and saying that, you know, if they were not, perhaps this had something to do with the lobbying power within veterans administrations and veterans associations, you know, on the part of older veterans, that perhaps younger veterans with more severe issues weren't getting the attention they need. what would you say to that? >> joe is a friend of mine. you know, i should have explained to him we do prioritize our claims. if you're homeless, if you're in
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financial difficulties, if you're a degree of medical medal of honor recipient and i brought up the issue of agent orange. for four decades, you know, administration after administration had looked at agent orange and said that is probably not related to the current conditions and it took this secretary, wounded vietnam veteran to say it's time for justice and time to get this right. so we did prioritize the vietnam vets after four decades of waiting. >> tommy sowers, you're a veteran and working hard for your fellow veterans today. we have to do better and i hope you'll come back and keep us posted on this. >> thanks very much. coming up next, it is spring training making a turn here on the set. the president of major league baseball advance media bob bowman is going to let barnicle play with his ipad! it's going to be exciting. >> that's a way to wake up. >> preview of the number one best-selling apps is coming up. ♪ it's a brown-eyed handsome man
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welcome back to "morning joe." everything upon to this point
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has been prelude. the president and ceo of mlb, good to see you. >> good morning. how are you? favorite show as you know. >> you are an avid and active viewer. >> i grew up watching this getting ready with my mother. my son watches with the two of us. not just politics, but also government. >> how old is your son? >> he's 15. >> he watches as he gets ready for school? >> that's the theory. >> he goes somewhere until 3:00. >> it's not clear exactly. >> that kid's future has seen doubt. >> you have a couple of things you want to talk about. >> the number one selling sports ap. >> the iphone back when and the ipad more recently.
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they both seem like part of our culture. >> talk about the ap. >> the game of baseball itself. we were out there before anybody. what makes a difference is we play every day. what you want in a phone is liability and what you want in an ap is reliability and coolness. whether you have barnacles or a yankees fan, whatever the team might be, you want to get there and the game lends itself to what the ap does. the ap is reliability. we deliver video fast and navigation more easily than anybody. people say look at this. we have to deliver the goods and it can be cool. >> mike is the biggest fan. talk about this. >> we thought wireless would be big. we hired three wireless
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developers. iphone didn't exist. we were unfolding phones in 2005. we hired these developers and started developing the regular phones. they were called smart phones and apple said they were going to do this with this new iphone and did we want to develop with that. we sent developers to look at that. they thought about it and they were huge baseball fans. they were huge fans. when a fan wants to see it and what they want to see on the home screen and what they don't want to see like an ap. they developed it and the rest is history. we were a step ahead of everybody. >> we wired the ipad. show us the coolest part. >> the coolest part of this is tv navigation. we will go to my favorite page which is the scoreboard. all 15 games right here.
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see them live right here. everyone has a favorite team and this is where you should start. we have no live games here at 8:00 in the morning. say you are a yankees fan. you get the box screen with the plays and if you like videos, all of the younger generation does, hit a button and you see the highlights right there. it respects your time. we did all of that in ten seconds. i have two teenagers and you have young children, time is more valuable than money. give it to them quickly. if you are on it for two minutes, we want it to be fun-filled. >> is it a big money maker? >> yes, it is a big money maker. we decided it was not just the leagues, but the media.
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the internet until that time was free. we said no, we don't think it should be free. we have been charging 5% of the content that is charged. live games on and on the ap itself. it's not a lot, but almost 3.5 million subscribers. >> you have monthly and a annual? >> we like the annual better, but we offer a monthly too. if that's what you top the do, that's fine too. >> i was going to ask you what's the break down in terms of that? >> it's interesting because on the apple devices it's 80% annual and 80% premium. on android it's about 50-50 and 70 or 80% premium. >> why is that? >> android is a cheaper phone. different customers and more cost conscious.
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the ap market is not quite as big. they are great phones. it moved into the next generation. comparable to iphone. >> the annual is a better deal. >> it's a better deal and i recommend each of you buy it immediately. >> they want to play with this a little bit more. you can listen to this. >> the box scores. bang, bang, bang. >> the commissioner wants to see the attendance as you know. we have the attendance and you can see whatever game. >> can i get a chat window and get on with bud? >> you can open a chat window and our commissioner is probably not on there. as important as that is, he doesn't have the time. >> does it show you which yankee
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has been injured if you refresh it? >> nobody is going to count the yankees out. you never count the yankees out. >> i know you are not in business of predictions, but who do you like? >> april is a great month. all 30 teams walk in with open and expectations. >> where did you grow up? >> i grew up a brewer fan. like every team -- >> you are the worst. coming up next, the judicial tea leaves when it comes to the cases on same-sex marriage being considered with the u.s. supreme court.
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good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast. a live look at new york city. new york magazine's john howman. in washington with us, michael steele. let's begin with yesterday's proceedings at the supreme court before we talk about today. calling the court on the question of gay marriage ambivalent. choose your adjective here.
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skeptical is used by the "wall street journal" about the question of whether or not this case should have been brought before the supreme court. they haven't talked about the arguments this morning on the marriage act or doma. after tuesday's heated debate after california's proposition 8. activists on social media. no consensus on how the justices might act. questions and comments on the justices about the reluctances of same-sex marriage in all states. several focusing on the term standing. whether the case has been properly defended by the state and traveled the correct legal path. that could set up the possibility of the high court throwing out the case. they are concerned about the new legal frontiers ahead. >> you want us to render a decision based on an assessment of the effects of this
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institution that is new on cell phones and the internet? we do not have the ability to see the future. >> you are really asking because of the sociological evidence for us to go into uncharted waters and you can play with that metaphor. there is a wonderful destination. >> justice anthony kennedy who could be the swing vote here. we address the legal implications and he discusses what the case may mean for children of same-sex couples. >> there is an immediate legal injury or what would be a legal injury. that's the voice of these children. there is some 40,000 children in california according to this that live with same-sex parents. they want their parents to have full recognition and full status. the voice of those children is
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important. >> two of the court's most conservative justices raised pointed questions over the label of marriage itself and of the timing of this case. >> i'm curious, when did it become unconstitutional to exclude homosexual couples from marriage? 1701? 1868 when the 14th amendment was inducted. >> when did it become unconstitutional to prohibit interracial marriages? >> it's just about the label in this case. >> the labels. >> it's just about the label? >> it means something. >> sure. if you tell a child that somebody has to be their friend, i suppose you can force the child to say this is my friend, but it changes the definition of what it means to be a friend. that's what seems to me what the
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supporters of proposition 8 is. all you are interested in is the label and you are insisting on changing the definition. >> the question, what other limits may be put on people who might marry. >> if you are over the age of 55 you don't help us serve in regulating procreation through marriage. why is that different? >> your honor, even with respect to couples over the age of 55, it is very rare that both parties to the couple are infertile. >> no really. because if a couple -- i can just assure you if the woman or the man are over 55, there not a lot of children coming out of that marriage. >> that's elena kagan. how old are you?
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seriously. >> this is a fair question. >> you are not over 55. >> there was one close to 50. let's start conversation with you. it's always a treat to listen to the supreme court. we don't get to hear that very often. >> i think the coverage in the papers as we show is correct. the court is ambivalent and torn and doesn't quite know what to do. they don't want to have to deal with the question just yet. they are uncomfortable with the standing issue. the reason why we are having these conversations is because the governor of california, the attorney general of california decided they think proposition 8 is unconstitutional and they are not defending it. a group of citizens bring this challenge. if the case goes down, that gives the court the ability to say we can't even decide the
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issue because you folks should have been here in the first place. i think they are struggling with the question and this is something that ted olsson is pushing from the anti-prop 8 side, is there a constitutional right to marry? national constitutional right to marry. clearly from the question, the court is very uncomfortable with doing something for all 50 states that deals only with california. >> if the supreme court decides that this case should not be in front of them in the first place, gay marriage will be allowed to stand in california. it was struck down by the supreme court there. it will be allowed in california and limited to california if this is what they decide. >> right. i'm stuck by the comment about the court not wanting to rule on something that is newer than cell phones and the internet. there is a real issue here. the court is a fundamentally
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conservatived about and tend to be behind social trends, but support was not new. there was a piece looking at how there has been steady support for gay marriage around the country since 2004. this is not a snap thing. the court is usually behind social trends. this is only building. >> senator castro of montana. in montana came out in favor of same-sex marriage. the political shifts and the court is not immune to hearing the politics of this. the shifts have been dazzling in the speed of which it occurred. >> whether the court for a lot of people in favor of marriage rights for gay people, if the court decides to strike the case down, that will be a victory for gay marriage not just in the state of california, but for the democratic process.
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on a state by state basis, gay marriage can be instituted and states will be open to do that. given the way political tides are turning, that's true across the country in state after state. the tide is maybe slower in the liberal states, but headed in one direction. more in virginia and a lot of southern states and rural states. jonathan pointed out for young republicans, it's a majority issue. the train left the station. we will get to the point where gay marriage will be legal in 50 states and the court does go in the moderate direction. we will triumph for marriage rights and the question is not when or whether, but when. it will be a settled matter
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across the country. >> a victory striking down prop 8 having the most populous state in the country, that will be huge. folks will go to california to get matter and go back to their home states and try to apply for the benefits. the thing is more than 30 states have either a state constitutional ban or a law banning same-sex marriage. that gets to why ted olsson wants the supreme court to do a sweeping ruling. you wipe away all the bans with one ruling. >> it would be faster to get there that way. otherwise it's going to take decades to unwind all of this. >> we get into a lot of trouble when we read the tea leaves of the supreme court. what did you see last night? any reason it wouldn't be left to the state? >> no. i think this court very much wants to punt this bad boy back to the states as fast as they
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can get it there. the adjectives that have been set forth to describe the court's attitude or mind seti think are accurate. they are more than hesitant to jump into this. you saw the tell tale sign from ruth bader ginsburg who indicated we made the mistake with roe vs. wade by acting too soon and not giving the states a chance to vet this more fully. i think the justices really want to do that. i want to appoint it about the support and the statistics. support among the population is one thing. adjudication is different. now with the states that jonathan mentioned, 30 states having adjudicated this constitutionally or legislatively, when the lawsuits come through the system it will
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be very interesting to see how it plays out. that's something the court would rather have it happen that way. as opposed to undoing the legislative decisions or constitutional decisions. the final point is this activity on the ground and among the state legislatures is not the same level of support you see necessarily at the national level. you can sign the national figures and individuals all you want. we are coming around and finding themselves involved on the issue. the state legislature is where the action or the game is. 30 states said no to same-sex marriage and now the test is going to be whether or not that tide can change. >> meanwhile, he was once the most high profile member of the united states military, but since a scandal exposes the affair, david petraeus stayed out of the spotlight. the university of southern california acknowledged his fall
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from grace. the first public speech that the revelation of his terrorist with his biographer. it indicated something more. the presidential short lister was seeking not only forgiveness, but a return to public life. >> it truly is a privilege to be here with you all the more so given my personal journey over the past five months. i join you keenly aware i am regarded in a different light now than a year ago. allow me to begin my remarks by reiterating how deeply i regret and apologize for the circumstances that led to my resignation from the cia and caused such pain for my family, friends, and supporters. i know i can never fully assuage the pain i inflicted on those close to me and a number of others. i can, however, try to move
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forward in a manner that is consistent to the values to which i subscribe before slipping. >> the retired four-star general called on the community to take care of the veterans of war. let me ask you about his future. he was one of the five more highly regarded americans in public political life before his call. we had forgiven politicians and leaders for shortcomings like this. what is his future? >> i think that there two areas where we have that. one is the judgment of history in terms of military service. that i think he will rehabilitate himself. it's relevant to what he accomplished as a leader of the american armed forces and a variety of theaters and in time
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this will go away. on the political side this is a question about whether he wanted a future outside the military and. able life. many wanted him to get involved and take that step. it was never clear he wanted to, but signs he had those ambitions. in terms of the forgiveness that the public may give him, he would be fine. the question is if we are all military, the claim to fame and the point is that they were successful in the military. how do you make the transition when you have lost the position. he is no longer tethered to that pedigree. he's out on his own. the question is not whether the country forgives him, but the lack of forgiveness. what he would build a future on if he no longer is involved with the enterprise that made him prominent in the first place. >> you get the sense that it's a
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man who wants to reinsert himself into politics? >> i think he wants ab solution obviously. i don't know general petraeus and i can't predict the future, but to john's point, what's his platform? what does he stand on two and three years down the road? 10, 12 years ago, he knows where iraq is. >> he's got a lot to say in areas that matter. that was one of the things i was most sorry about in this episode. this is a guy who has a lot to contribute on things like afghanistan, conflict and redesigning what's going on right now. i think we could say a lot there. i am fascinated in american culture how quickly rehabilitation happens. it's a case study. in england when this happens,
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people go away and do charity work. >> somebody said yesterday, what did he do again? if you were choosing a presidential candidate, would you like his resume at this point? >> yeah, duh. absolutely. i think the whole petraeus flap up was just that. it was a lot of noise about nothing at the end of the day. his come back should be welcomed by the country. a lot of people have found the forgiveness for him and looking for better things down the road. he was well-received and an important first step on the road. he is someone to look at whether behind the scenes or in front of the scenes. >> still ahead, hiring our heroes. today's jobs fair for veterans and military spouses in new york
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city. how this program helped put nearly 100,000 americans back to work. you can bring a pocket knife on the plane, but don't think about an ipad or kindle during take off. we will ask about the tsa and faa's priorities when it comes to passenger safety. we will look at the forecast. hey, bill. >> beating the drum on the cold weather and how bad the march has been. we will talk about what hasn't been happening. severe storms. not a lot of severe weather outbreaks. we have the number of tornados we get to and may is the peak of the season. 257. march is when we begin our season. about 85 across the country. we only had this many. 14. that is it. we had 42 tornado-related last month. that's good. the only benefits with the cold dry air. you don't get the thunderstorms.
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we are starting to warm up after a very cold start to the day. 27 degrees in jackson, mississippi. 35 in tallahassee. people on spring break with winter coats and gloves. a little bit this afternoon. temperatures down along the gulf in the low 60s. a sprinkle or two. sunny and warm in the morning and cloud and a few showers late in the day. no big storms, just a few showers in the northwest. we slowly warm up and no more of the four-letter word, snow in the forecast. washington, d.c. is looking at a big warm up in the upper 50s by the weekend. you are watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks.
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the vice president of the flight attendants, it's good to see you. we have to one sheet the preparation for this. none of us need a one-sheet. we are regular flyers. let's take care of the knives that carry on to airplanes. it's ridiculous. this is ridiculous. >> it is ridiculous. i lost friends on september 11 that ended up at the world trade
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center. we learned the next day that no knives would be allowed on board. keep knives off the airplane. when we talked with passenger and crew numbers, no one thinks this is a good idea. who is asking for knifes on board? the tsa will have to look at the knifes to see what size they are and if they fit or not. this doesn't help for efficiency. >> did tsa come to the flight attendants and ask what they thought? >> they did not. our jobs changed immediately. the day after september 11 we were not only aviation's first responders, but suddenly the last line of defense. i talked with a crew this week who experienced an incident on board the aircraft where there was a gentlemen who rushed the cockpit and attacked the flight attendants and they were screaming for help and they had to check him and direct passengers to help them in knowa
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aggressive manner. they said 9/11 won't happen again because the passengers won't let it. this guy didn't have a knife. now we are going to arm these people and give them a knife? it doesn't make sense. you guys travel. you want to be able to bring shampoo and other items through security. you get to be inconvenienced because those are legitimate threats, but your security doesn't matter. for him security stops at the pocket. he needs to rethink his policy and resint it. it takes congress we are working on that as well. >> they are defending the tsa saying in part and i'm quoting, we are trying to prevent a bomb from getting on the plane. if you are talking about a small knife that somebody can convert with a small sharp object.
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how do you feel about that? >> that's exactly what it is. an excuse. blades having small knives aboard the aircraft. we are hearing from our military people and the air marshalls, this is an invitation. let's not put more weapons into the terrorist's hands. it's about the safety and security on board the flights. not just defending ourselves, but making sure when the airplane lands, everybody is alive and well when it does. it doesn't make sense. >> what about the notion that this changed in the rules to bring the united states in line with europe. >> now you are really going to get me going. when was the last time the u.s. took the lead from europe? the shoe bomber and the pant bomber went through security in paris and amsterdam.
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you should know that canada has the same restrictions we have. they are not changing anything. we are going to follow europe's lead? it's inconsistent and the tsa is coming up with excuse after excuse. they are slipping and slighting all over the place. this is a slippery slope. what's next? what are we going to add to the aircraft cabins who are an airtight metal tube where the planes are fuller than ever and the temperatures are hotter than ever and we see the disturbances that is threatening everybody's safety. we had somebody slap a baby. let's put a knife in his hand. sounds like a good idea to me. >> michael steele is in washington, d.c. and if you are in seat 1a, he is not in seat 1a. >> i'm in the back of the plane.
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quick question. it's good to see you again. quick question. you have the whole thing with knives. we don't need knifes on the planes, but i would like to keep my shoes on to get through that process. what about this whole thing with ipads and being able to read and don't have to turn everything off. is that for security or so you have our attention? what's behind that? i don't see how an ipad interferes with how the plane takes off and lands. >> there documented incidents of hand held device interfering with the navigation and the auto pilot. this is science-based. the faa is doing due diligence to check up on this science and created something we are apart of for what makes sense. i know that we all love our electronic devices and i'm included in that.
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we want air travel to be save and secure first, but efficient and convenient for people. let's not forget the airline industry does not grow in technology at the same rate the electronics do. it has to be science-base and make sure that the safety and security is involved. we have concerns about that critical phase of flight when we are giving instructions to passengers and don't want them to be not listened to. >> we want to pass that information on to everybody who flies in air force one because they use their cell phones on the plane and during landing. >> and the pilots too. >> we all left our cell phones on accidentally too. >> go ahead. what did you say? >> air force one may be able to handle it, but we have all kinds of airplanes that were built
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decades ago and we have to make sure it's safe across the board and we have to meet the lowest common denominator. no knives on planes.com. keep the knives off the planes. >> you are talking the lowest common denominator. thanks very much. up next, hiring our heroes. how companies are teaming up with the chamber to put american military families back to work. a preview of today's god fairies next on "morning joe." [ kitt ] you know what's impressive? a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it.
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we are doing something important before the bell with brian shackman. he is joining us from the heroes job fair in new york city. brian, this is a terrific thing going on. tell us about it. >> yeah, i know you did veteran stuff yesterday too. it's an assignment where you take your journalistic hat off for a second. there 100 plus companies and over 1,000 veteran who is look for and apply for jobs. part of the u.s. chamber of
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commerce launched to get 500,000 veterans jobs. they have eclipsed 100,000 and have commitments for 100,000 more. that's an incredible progress. for people who don't understand the issue, the unemployment rate is 7.7%. for veterans in the post 9/11 era, it's close to 10%. if you look at people under 25, it's closer to 30%. people talk about wall street and you can criticize, but they are getting on board. the city hired 800 veterans in 2012. wells fargo more than 1,000. since 2011, jpmorgan hired more than 5,000. we can make jokes about the parent company that are tongue in cheek, but comcast are doubling down to 2,000. we talked to veterans here recruiting and have jobs and
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those that are looking. people came home and boom, they were the first lieutenants and they had great jobs at capital one in three weeks. some don't have college educations trying to find out where they slight into the system. putting aside issues of ptsd, they try to figure out what to do with their lives and convince the. employers that they do translate. >> they are looking for leadership and people skills, take a look at a veteran. >> what are about technology skills? there is a lot of that. >> there absolutely is. the key and it's an interesting point is convincing the employer that is the skills are translatable. that is the biggest thing. some of these guys are getting coached by the companies on how to get that message across. i have to tell you, you can say all you want about patriotism, but these are people you want to help. they are here to help themselves and not all of them will get
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jobs today. there 300,000 more to try to get into this program, but listen, it's an effort and the effort is there and that's part of the battle. >> thanks very much. appreciate it. coming up next. nbc news correspondent and author on what he calls the lifetime search for ordinary people doing extraordinary things. great, great story teller. keep it here on "morning joe." we're here! we're going to the park! [ gina ] oh hey, dan!
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misplaced his nobel prize. fame is not the most important thing on mario's mind. his wife laurie has bigger news. >> he got the nobel prize and
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two years later i was diagnosed with cancer. >> ironically mario won the nobel for giving science a blueprint to control the spread of that dreaded disease. >> this is a model essentially for cancer. >> now the quest to find a cure is personal. >> that was part of one of the american stories with bob datsun. he is out with a new book, american story, a time search for ordinary people doing extraordinary things. he is amazing when you look at the stuff that is available online and the blogs and things like that. you look at your stuff and the secret is still there. people like to see stories about people and read about people. you made a lifetime out of doing it. >> i started in 1972 by going to the olympics and reported for nbc news.
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trying to become a star. i met somebody who said we don't see ourselves on and don't hear ourselves on radio. the music is played and we hardly ever read about ourselves unless our child is down a well. we don't matter. i thought maybe we ought to peel back that mirror that reflects and see what these folks are doing between the bright lights. i think in my opinion after 40 years of doing this, those are the people are the reason we are here today. not necessarily the gridlock in washington, but your uncle or grandfather did something. they made a decision and solved a type of challenge and probably the same challenge we have today. don't go out and do jerry falwell. do a series on ordinary people and something pops up every time. >> this is a hard question.
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40 years you have been doing this, what are two or three of the most interesting stories of the people? >> can you answer that question? >> it's like saying do you like the red headed freckled kid or the with curly hair? you have to have a book on the whole thing. i think when i look back, the one woman that really kind of put it on was a classic survivor of the great depression in the dust bowl. it was a great photograph that dorothy shot of her. she had the children all hanging on the children. remember that picture? i found her 50 years later and she never talked to a reporter. dorothy never sent her a
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picture. she lived on a mobile home on the place of the exact same site where that picture was taken. when the picture was taken, she was 29 and had five children and pregnant with another and a husband that died about a week before. >> what did she say by the look on her face. she was looking into the distance and it was the cares of the world. >> i did. she went on to have 10 children and married that summer. i asked her and she said, you know, if i lost hope this country wouldn't be here. i love that line. it might have been a slip of the tongue, but it's absolutely. it's not a question of you talk to a lot of people and say this person has this or this person has that because they were dealt
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a good hand. you look at the ones that come out the other side, they are not waiting for the good hand. they play a bad hand well over and over and over again. they come through. that's the way it was. >> let me ask ow the flip side. you have done basically portraiture throughout your career. they love when the individual story connects to the universal. there 12 stories. what are the things or the themes that come out? what's the unifying fanatic? the things that tie the stories together. >> that was the big story in writing the book. it's not that. the stories are the examples of what we are trying to point out. the one thing that i notice and you do a story, most of the time they didn't know they had a story. underneath the surface story, there is always a blueprint that
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maybe would gift reader an insight on how to get through life a little better. there is a photographer in washington state who did not just one thing, but two things and has no power. the first thing was he saved an ancient for guest where the trees were older than the first trees of france and england. he is taking a second and sending it to the insurance company in boston. it's not a huge force. i figured the rope -- if you put it out in your room, you will see how big it is. you say big. secondly, you have one of the most recent national parks. and he was not invited to the opening. all of his trends, that's how we found out the story. when i called him, he said i didn't go because in order to get anything done, you have to
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have power and money. the people with power and money have to say they did it all themselves. if the person who really did it stands up next to them, power and money disappear. i approached the problem that if you are going to ride a bicycle with your child and as soon as the training wheels are off and he wobbles off, you don't run along and say look what dad did. you applaud. that's a wonderful take away. >> let me ask you your own story figures in your book. you survived polio as a child. how has that factored into your work? >> well, when i was two years old, my parents came in to wish me a happy birthday and as the story goes, i couldn't get out of bed. i was in and out of hospitals and my mom had to take me downtown to a hospital until i was about 9 years old and they did an operation to put my heel down. put an extra piece of tendon in
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there. i remember when the doctors came to me one time and said i have a book for you. it's the little engine that could. with polio victims if you find today, people of my generation, if you survive polio, you overachieved. if you play 18 rounds of golf, you have 36. you can have a normal life if you press through. that was a huge reason that i began telling stories and i had a grand father who was a great story teller. he didn't just say we moved to maple drive, but he would weave these wonderful stories and i understood how to attract an audience with that. >> bob dotson over the course of 40 years. 40 million people are more interested in the people we put
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on tv every single day. >> a lot more interesting than you. >> sorry that called for? >> no. >> american story. a lifetime search for ordinary people doing extraordinary things. >> governor chris christie assuring queen elizabeth she has nothing to worry about when prince harry visits the jersey shore. i'm going to slap you as soon as we get off the air. >> i hope so. if youthen this willbrids arbe a nice surprise.
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the autopsy here says that to reach the kids, the gop should establish a republican celebrity task force. yes. an elite squad of conservative super stars ready to deploy as soon as we activate the celebrity task force signal. gop celebrity task force assemble! john voit, victoria jackson, tom
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selleck, kelsey grammar, cliff claven, lady from northern exposure and at least one baldwin. this guy from that thing. i'm telling you, they will not know what hit them. i'm not sure they know who these people are. >> this is because the public has the right to know. the palace from prince harry visits the united states in may. he was caught playing a game in vegas. on this strip, they will visit washington, colorado and the tri-state area. for those of you what don't know shlgs it's connecticut, new york, and new jersey. when it stops, they will have a chaperon. new jersey governor, chris christie. >> i will be spending the entire day with prince harry and
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believe me, no one will get naked. i can assure the people that much to their relief. she knows that she can trust her grandson with the governor of the state of new jersey. >> the two of you will be in a t-shirt? >> no question. the hottest t-shirts of the summer jersey shore season. me and prince harry. >> that's what i'm saying. up next, what if anything did we learn today? easter's here, and i'm with janette talking about the walmart low price guarantee. that's your receipt from another store? yep. let's go! check out that price. that's walmart's every day low price. that's what i'm talking about! yes, yes! oh my goodness! that's the walmart low price guarantee! bring in your last grocery receipt and see for yourself. save more on the candy your family loves. with low prices on reese's eggs and bunnies, cadbury creme eggs, and all their hershey's favorites.
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an ally for real possibilities. aarp. find tools and direction at aarp.org/possibilities. >> what have you learned in washington? >> even as we seem to go into uncharted waters on gay marriage or gun control, there seems to be a.m. bif lens as reflected in the supreme court and congress. >> what did you learn in. >> i have to be more careful and turn this off on the plane. it can bring it down. >> when did that come on? >> and i have to get it out. >> i learned that bob dotson had polio as a child. >> good guy. despite